Haus der Kunst, Munich || Exhibition: Louise Bourgeois. Structures of Existence: The Cells || until 02.08.2015

In an artistic career spanning seven decades, Louise Bourgeois (1911, Paris – 2010, New York) created a unique body of work in a wide range of form, material and scale. In the 1940s, she pioneered the use of environmental installation for her work, and in the 1970s and 80s she would at times bring her sculpture into dialogue with theater and performance. Further, her work helped shift critical discourse to encompass psychoanalysis and feminism, theories that have since become prevalent in the artistic language of contemporary art today.

Among the most innovative and challenging sculptural works in her extensive oeuvre are the “Cells”, a series of architectural spaces that preoccupied her for nearly 20 years. Bourgeois’s “Cells” are intensely psychological microcosms: situated within various enclosures, each is a multi-faceted collection of objects and sculptural forms arranged to evoke an atmosphere of emotional resonance. In almost theatrical scenes, these everyday objects, items of clothing or fabric, or furniture, along with singular sculptures by Bourgeois, create a charged barrier between the interior world of the artist and the exterior world that is the exhibition space.

As Bourgeois stated: “The ‘Cells’ represent different types of pain: the physical, the emotional and psychological, and the mental and intellectual. When does the emotional become physical? When does the physical become emotional? It’s a circle going round and round. …Each ‘Cell’ deals with the pleasure of the voyeur, the thrill of looking and being looked at. The ‘Cells’ either attract or repulse each other. There is this urge to integrate, merge, or disintegrate.” (Louise Bourgeois, 1991)

In this exhibition, the first to concentrate on the “Cells” series, Haus der Kunst will assemble the largest number of “Cells” presented to date. It will also include important works from previous decades that led to the development of this body of work. This comprehensive survey will bring to light key facets of Bourgeois’s thinking about space and memory, the body and architecture, and the conscious and the unconscious.

Public program

Wednesday, 13.05, 7 pm
Louise Bourgeois: The Cells. Lecture by Mieke Bal
In English

Tuesday, 09.06, 7 pm
An evening with Siri Hustvedt
In English

With a special thanks to the Louise Bourgeois Trust and The Easton Foundation. With major funding by Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne and with generous support by Roland Berger Strategy Consultants. Further support provided by Cheim & Read, Hauser & Wirth and Kukje Gallery.

Cultural partner
m94,5

Louise Bourgeois, Red Room (Child), 1994 (detail), Collection Musée d'Art Contemporain de Montréal, photo Marcus Leith © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Red Room (Child), 1994 (detail), Collection Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal, photo Marcus Leith © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Spider, 1997 (detail), installation view (Bordeaux), Collection The Easton Foundation, photo Frédéric Delpech © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Spider, 1997 (detail), installation view (Bordeaux), Collection The Easton Foundation, photo Frédéric Delpech © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Spider, 1997 (detail), installation view (Madrid), Collection The Easton Foundation, photo Frédéric Delpech © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Spider, 1997 (detail), installation view (Madrid), Collection The Easton Foundation, photo Frédéric Delpech © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Cell (You Better Grow Up), 1993 (detail), The Rachofsky Collection, Dallas, photo Peter Bellamy © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Cell (You Better Grow Up), 1993 (detail), The Rachofsky Collection, Dallas, photo Peter Bellamy © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Cell II, 1991 (detail), Collection Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, photo Peter Bellamy © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, Cell II, 1991 (detail), Collection Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, photo Peter Bellamy © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, In and Out, 1995 (detail), photo Christopher Burke © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Louise Bourgeois, In and Out, 1995 (detail), photo Christopher Burke © The Easton Foundation / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Source: Haus der Kunst

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Museum of London || Morning explorers || 25.04.2015 & 16.06.2015

Morning explorers is for families with children who have an Autistic Spectrum Condition (ASC), giving them the opportunity to come along and enjoy the Museum of London before the arrival of the general public.

The museum will open some of the galleries at 9am (normal opening hours are 10am-6pm), leaving you one hour to explore. All of these events are completely free and suitable for families with children under the age of 13. Activities will be available for families, including storytelling, self-directed trails through the galleries and an arts and craft session.

Places are limited to avoid overcrowding.

Science Museum, London || Exhibition: Revelations: Experiments in Photography || until 13.09.2015

‘It is a little bit of magic realised.’
William Henry Fox Talbot, ‘Photogenic Drawing’, Literary Gazette no.1150, 2 February 1839

Discover the influence of early scientific photography on modern and contemporary art in this major new exhibition, featuring some of the rarest images from the pioneers of photography.

From the 1840s, scientists were using photography as a device to record and measure phenomena which lay beyond human vision. The aesthetic beauty of this early photography and the revolutionary techniques developed for scientific study, shaped the history of photography and heavily influenced modern and contemporary art photographers.

Revelations showcases some of the earliest photographic images from the National Photography Collection by figures such as William Henry Fox Talbot and Eadweard Muybridge alongside striking works by modern and contemporary artists including Harold Edgerton and Hiroshi Sugimoto .

On display for the very first time will be an original photographic print of X-Ray, the earliest recorded images of the moon and 19th century photographs capturing the hidden beauty of electrical discharges.

Visit Revelations: Experiments in Photography to discover the untold history of how early scientific photography exerted a powerful influence on the work of modern and contemporary artists.


Image credits:

1. Blow Up: Untitled 1, 2007, Ori Gersht © Ori Gersht, Private Collection
2. Chronophotograph of a Man Clearing a Hurdle, c.1892, Étienne Jules Marey © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL
3. Negative Discharge, 1892, Alan Archibald Campbell Swinton © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL
4. Bullet Through Lemon, c. 1955 – Color ©Harold Edgerton, MIT, 2015, courtesy of Palm Press, Inc.
5. Insect wings, c.1840. William Henry Fox Talbot © National Media Museum  SSPL


After its run in London, Revelations will go on show at the National Media Museum, Bradford from 19 November 2015 – 7 February 2016.

Negative Discharge, 1892, Alan Archibald Campbell Swinton © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

Negative Discharge, 1892, Alan Archibald Campbell Swinton © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

Bullet Through Lemon, c. 1955 - Color ©Harold Edgerton, MIT, 2015, courtesy of Palm Press, Inc.

Bullet Through Lemon, c. 1955 – Color ©Harold Edgerton, MIT, 2015, courtesy of Palm Press, Inc.

Insect wings, c.1840. William Henry Fox Talbot © National Media Museum  SSPL

Insect wings, c.1840. William Henry Fox Talbot © National Media Museum SSPL

Blow Up: Untitled 1, 2007, Ori Gersht © Ori Gersht, Private Collection

Blow Up: Untitled 1, 2007, Ori Gersht © Ori Gersht, Private Collection

Chronophotograph of a Man Clearing a Hurdle, c.1892, Étienne Jules Marey © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

Chronophotograph of a Man Clearing a Hurdle, c.1892, Étienne Jules Marey © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

Europe is Getting its First Techno Museum in Frankfurt

Dance music – specifically, techno – has had its dalliances inside the museum space, with one notable example being Richie Hawtin performing as Plastikman inside New York’s MOMA. However, only one institution, Detroit’s Exhibit 3000, is dedicated solely to the genre.

That will soon change, however, as plans are officially underway to bring Europe its first techno museum, making it the second of its type in the world. As Dazed reports, DJ Andreas Tomalla, otherwise known as Talla 2XLC, is heading an effort to open The Museum of Modern Electronic Music (MOMEM) in Frankfurt, Germany.

Aside from his DJ status, Tomalla has a personal connection to the project, being credited with coining the term “techno” and having opened Frankfurt’s first electronic music venue Technoclub back in the ’80s.

As the official website states, MOMEM is not a museum “in the classical sense,” but as “a place in the here and now, an experience which sensitizes for many electronic aspects of life.” A tentative layout of the space (below) shows sections for topics such as History & Influences, Instruments/Technology, Global Movement, Electronic Music Styles, Wardrobe Wearables and Graphic Design.

MOMEM will be located inside Frankfurt’s Children’s Museum and has a launch date planned for 2017. While it’s still in its planning phases, patrons are encouraged to pledge their support through the MOMEM Supporter Club, which promises perks such as free annual visits to the museum and its related activities.

Europe is Getting its First Techno Museum in Frankfurt

Europe is Getting its First Techno Museum in Frankfurt

Source: Beatport

MUSA ~ The Museum of the University of St Andrews || Exhibition: Doctors in the Making ~ Medicine at St Andrews|| until 19.04.2015

#StoMouseio

How have doctors learned to keep us fit and healthy? In this exhibition you’ll discover how our knowledge of the human body and healthcare has developed over time.  Rarely seen items from the University’s medical collections reveal the role St Andrews has played in pioneering life-changing medical discoveries. They show how technology, equipment and the human body itself have changed the ways in which doctors treat us.

Doctors in the Making: Medicine at St Andrews Doctors in the Making: Medicine at St Andrews

Small Doctors bag MUSA ~ The Museum of the University of St Andrews || Exhibition: Doctors in the Making ~ Medicine at St Andrews|| until 19.04.2015 Small Doctors bag MUSA ~ The Museum of the University of St Andrews || Exhibition: Doctors in the Making ~ Medicine at St Andrews|| until 19.04.2015

Cabinet of Curiosities MUSA ~ The Museum of the University of St Andrews || Exhibition: Doctors in the Making ~ Medicine at St Andrews|| until 19.04.2015 Cabinet of Curiosities MUSA ~ The Museum of the University of St Andrews || Exhibition: Doctors in the Making ~ Medicine at St Andrews|| until 19.04.2015

MUSA ~ The Museum of the University of St Andrews || Exhibition: Doctors in the Making ~ Medicine at St Andrews|| until 19.04.2015 MUSA ~ The Museum of the University of St Andrews || Exhibition: Doctors in the Making ~ Medicine at St Andrews|| until 19.04.2015

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The National Museum – Architecture (Oslo) || Exhibition: Forms of Freedom. African independence and Nordic models || until 19.04.2015

This exhibition ends tomorrow!

#StoMouseio

The National Museum – Architecture, Fehn Pavilion

One of the forms in which the Nordic countries initially supplied development aid to Africa was by sending Nordic architects to help in the process of nation building. Scandinavian politicians believed the social democratic model could be exported, and the new African leaders wanted cooperation partners without a colonialist past. This exhibition documents the buildings that architects designed for the newly independent states of Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia, and the ways in which schools, industrial estates and symbolic buildings have since been accepted, used, adapted or rejected. The exhibition was shown in the Nordic Pavilion at the Architecture Biennale in Venice in 2014.

Curator: Nina Berre
Co-curator: Gro Bonesmo (Space Group)
Project Manager: Nina Frang Høyum

The exhibition is produced by the National Museum in collaboration with the Architecture and Design Centre in Sweden and the Museum of Finnish Architecture.

Julius Nyerere, Tapani Katala og Oddvar Bjærum. Bilderettigheter: Oddvard Bjærum Julius Nyerere, Tapani…

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Kunsthaus Zürich || Exhibition: Monet, Gauguin, van Gogh ~ Japanese Inspirations || until 25.05.2015

Japanese art is of fundamental importance to the development of European Modernism. Almost all the great artists drew inspiration from its motifs and characteristic style. For the first time in over 25 years, a comprehensive exhibition examines the phenomenon known as ‘Japonisme’. The focus is on the period from 1860 to 1910 – the early phase and heyday of Japanese art’s reception in France.

Japan’s emergence from over 200 years of complete isolation in 1854 unleashed a veritable mania for the country in the West, especially France. This was spurred on by the wealth of desirable imports from Japan presented at the world’s fair exhibitions, in particular Vienna in 1873 and Paris in 1878.

The vogue for all things Japanese manifests itself in numerous ways: artists such as Monet, Gauguin and van Gogh, Bonnard and Degas depicted imported artworks and everyday objects in their own paintings, adopted Japanese imagery and – in a development that was to have much further-reaching consequences – internalized the visual idiom of the Japanese woodcut. Indeed, it was this very act of appropriation, combined with their own pictorial tradition, that informed a creative process which gave rise to many and varied forms of artistic expression, the impact of which endured long into the 20th century.

The presentation comprises over 300 prestigious exhibits, including paintings and a representative selection of Japanese woodcuts by Hokusai, Hiroshige, Utamaro and others, some of them drawn from the artists’ collections of the period. Artefacts from Japan are also juxtaposed with corresponding pieces from Europe. Historical photographs and a selection of highly graphic poster designs complete the survey of how Europe viewed Japan in the 19th century.

In collaboration with the Museum Folkwang in Essen.

Supported by the Truus and Gerrit van Riemsdijk Foundation, the Federal Office of Culture and our sponsoring paint supplier Farrow & Ball.

Pierre BonnardNannies’ Promenade, Frieze of Carriages1894/1897Four-panel screenlithographs in five colours, each 143 × 46 cmJules Maeght Collection, San Francisco © 2015 ProLitteris, Zurich

Pierre BonnardNannies’ Promenade, Frieze of Carriages1894/1897Four-panel screenlithographs in five colours, each 143 × 46 cmJules Maeght Collection, San Francisco © 2015 ProLitteris, Zurich

Edgar DegasBreakfast after the Batharound 1895/1890Pastel on paper, 121 × 92 cm Private collection

Edgar DegasBreakfast after the Batharound 1895/1890Pastel on paper, 121 × 92 cm Private collection

Keisai (Ikeda) Eisen, Chrysanthemums (Kiku)1830sColoured woodblock print, 36.8 × 24.5 cmBaur Foundation, Geneva / Photo Gérard, Geneva

Keisai (Ikeda) Eisen, Chrysanthemums (Kiku)1830sColoured woodblock print, 36.8 × 24.5 cmBaur Foundation, Geneva / Photo Gérard, Geneva

Paul GauguinReclining Tahitian Women / Arearea no varua ino1894Oil on canvas, 60 × 98 cm Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

Paul GauguinReclining Tahitian Women / Arearea no varua ino1894Oil on canvas, 60 × 98 cm Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

Utagawa HiroshigeThe Sea off Satta in Suruga Province (Suruga Satta kaijō)1858From the series ‘36 Views of Mount Fuji (Fuji sanjūrokkei)’Coloured woodblock print, 36.9 × 25.1 cmNational Museums in Berlin, Museum of Asian Art, photo: courtesy of the Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, © bpk

Utagawa HiroshigeThe Sea off Satta in Suruga Province (Suruga Satta kaijō)1858From the series ‘36 Views of Mount Fuji (Fuji sanjūrokkei)’Coloured woodblock print, 36.9 × 25.1 cmNational Museums in Berlin, Museum of Asian Art, photo: courtesy of the Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, © bpk

Utagawa HiroshigeInside Kameido Tenjin Shrine (Kameido Tenjin keidai)1856Plate 65 from the series ‘One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (Meisho Edo hyakkei)’Coloured woodblock print, 34.2 × 22.5 cmBibliothèque nationale de France, formerly in the Henri Rivière collection

Utagawa HiroshigeInside Kameido Tenjin Shrine (Kameido Tenjin keidai)1856Plate 65 from the series ‘One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (Meisho Edo hyakkei)’Coloured woodblock print, 34.2 × 22.5 cmBibliothèque nationale de France, formerly in the Henri Rivière collection

Katsushika Taito IICarp (Koi)around 1830–1844Coloured woodblock print, 36.4 × 17 cmNational Museums in Berlin, Museum of Asian Art Photo: courtesy of the Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto

Katsushika Taito IICarp (Koi)around 1830–1844Coloured woodblock print, 36.4 × 17 cmNational Museums in Berlin, Museum of Asian Art Photo: courtesy of the Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto

Katsushika HokusaiSouth Wind, Clear Sky (Gaifū kaisei)1830 – 1831From the series ‘36 Views of Mount Fuji (Fuji sanjūrokkei)’Coloured woodblock print, 36.9 × 25.1 cmBibliothèque nationale de France, formerly in the Henri Rivière collection

Katsushika HokusaiSouth Wind, Clear Sky (Gaifū kaisei)1830 – 1831From the series ‘36 Views of Mount Fuji (Fuji sanjūrokkei)’Coloured woodblock print, 36.9 × 25.1 cmBibliothèque nationale de France, formerly in the Henri Rivière collection

Japanese dyeing stencils2nd half of 19th c.Paper, cut, 41.1 × 62.8 cmMuseum Folkwang, Essen

Japanese dyeing stencils2nd half of 19th c.Paper, cut, 41.1 × 62.8 cmMuseum Folkwang, Essen

Claude MonetBed of Chrysanthemums1897Oil on canvas, 130.8 × 88.9 cm Private collection

Claude MonetBed of Chrysanthemums1897Oil on canvas, 130.8 × 88.9 cm Private collection

Claude MonetWater-Lily Pond1899Oil on canvas, 89 × 93 cm State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

Claude MonetWater-Lily Pond1899Oil on canvas, 89 × 93 cm State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

Tamamura KoōzaburōoA Wisteria Trellis at Kameido Shrine in Tokyo / ‘A499. Wysteria vine’2nd half of 19th c.Albumen print, hand-coloured, 18.5 × 24.3 cmSammlung P.+R. Herzog, Basel

Tamamura KoōzaburōoA Wisteria Trellis at Kameido Shrine in Tokyo / ‘A499. Wysteria vine’2nd half of 19th c.Albumen print, hand-coloured, 18.5 × 24.3 cmSammlung P.+R. Herzog, Basel

Japanese tea bowl (chawan) in the form of a shoe (kutsugata), Mino, Oribe typeEdo period, 18th c.Stoneware, green and white glaze, painted with iron, 8 × 14.8 × 13.3 cmMuseum Folkwang, Essen

Japanese tea bowl (chawan) in the form of a shoe (kutsugata), Mino, Oribe typeEdo period, 18th c.Stoneware, green and white glaze, painted with iron, 8 × 14.8 × 13.3 cmMuseum Folkwang, Essen

James Jacques Joseph TissotYoung Women Looking at Japanese Articles1869Oil on canvas, 70.5 × 50.2 cmCincinnati Art Museum, Gift of Henry M. Goodyear, M.D.

James Jacques Joseph TissotYoung Women Looking at Japanese Articles1869Oil on canvas, 70.5 × 50.2 cmCincinnati Art Museum, Gift of Henry M. Goodyear, M.D.

Félix VallottonThe Shower1894Woodcut, 25.3 × 32.2 cm Kunsthaus Zürich

Félix VallottonThe Shower1894Woodcut, 25.3 × 32.2 cm Kunsthaus Zürich

Vincent van GoghThe Courtesan (after Eisen)1887Oil on cotton, 110.3 × 60 cmVan Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Vincent van GoghThe Courtesan (after Eisen)1887Oil on cotton, 110.3 × 60 cmVan Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Vincent van GoghQuay with Men Unloading Sand Barges1888Oil on canvas, 55.1 × 66.2 cmMuseum Folkwang, Essen

Vincent van GoghQuay with Men Unloading Sand Barges1888Oil on canvas, 55.1 × 66.2 cmMuseum Folkwang, Essen

Utagawa YoshitoraCherry Blossom Time1847 – 1852Coloured woodblock print, middle part of triptych, 36 × 25 cmVan Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation) Copy formerly in the Van Gogh Collection

Utagawa YoshitoraCherry Blossom Time1847 – 1852Coloured woodblock print, middle part of triptych, 36 × 25 cmVan Gogh Museum, Amsterdam (Vincent van Gogh Foundation) Copy formerly in the Van Gogh Collection

Source: Kunsthaus Zürich